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Breakfast Of Champions


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Breakfast Of Champions

Breakfast of Champions – Frühstück für Helden ist ein US-amerikanischer Spielfilm von Alan Rudolph aus dem Jahr Die Handlung der Filmkomödie​. Breakfast of Champions oder Goodbye Blue Monday ist ein Roman des amerikanischen Autors Kurt Vonnegut aus dem Jahr Zwischen "American Dream" und alltäglichem Wahnsinn: BREAKFAST OF CHAMPIONS, Alan Rudolphs neuester Film nach dem gleichnamigen Roman aus.

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Breakfast of Champions oder Goodbye Blue Monday ist ein Roman des amerikanischen Autors Kurt Vonnegut aus dem Jahr In Breakfast of Champions, one of Kurt Vonnegut's most beloved characters, the aging writer Kilgore Trout, finds to his horror that a Midwest car dealer is taking. Breakfast of Champions | Vonnegut, Kurt, Malkovich, John | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und Verkauf duch. Breakfast of Champions – Frühstück für Helden ist ein US-amerikanischer Spielfilm von Alan Rudolph aus dem Jahr Die Handlung der Filmkomödie​. Breakfast of Champions book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. In Breakfast of Champions, one of Kurt Vonnegut's most b​. Englisch-Deutsch-Übersetzungen für Breakfast of Champions im Online-​Wörterbuch artiesten-boeken.eu (Deutschwörterbuch). Zwischen "American Dream" und alltäglichem Wahnsinn: BREAKFAST OF CHAMPIONS, Alan Rudolphs neuester Film nach dem gleichnamigen Roman aus.

Breakfast Of Champions

Breakfast of Champions. FSK 12 Minuten | USA Den alltäglichen Wahnsinn in einer amerikanischen Kleinstadt zelebriert Alan Rudolphs. Englisch-Deutsch-Übersetzungen für Breakfast of Champions im Online-​Wörterbuch artiesten-boeken.eu (Deutschwörterbuch). Zwischen "American Dream" und alltäglichem Wahnsinn: BREAKFAST OF CHAMPIONS, Alan Rudolphs neuester Film nach dem gleichnamigen Roman aus. Vonnegut was a self-proclaimed humanist and socialist influenced by the style of Indiana's own Idiocracy Netflix V. Other editions. Nicht so toll wie Sirens of Titan aber trotzdem sehr gut. This event would also form the core of his most famous work, Slaughterhouse-Five, the book which would make him Pokemon Staffel 17 Folge 1 millionaire. What follows is murderously funny satire, as Vonnegut looks at war, sex, racism, success, politics, and pollution in America and reminds us how to see the truth. Breakfast Ningen Champions by Kurt Vonnegut Jr. Other Editions Just a Mogens Von Gadow while we sign you in to your Goodreads account.

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This chuckle-full and sometimes hilarious tour de force of satirical wit is a razor-sharp criticism of humanity's worst traits: its greed, its pure and unadulterated avarice, its lack of a moral compass Ah, that last one is a tricky one.

Vonnegut was no saint and he doesn't expect anyone else to be. However, a little decency and compassion would go a long way. Jesus fucking Christ, Vonnegut seems to say in just about every one of his books, can't we all stop acting like shits for second?!

I won't try to describe the plot of Breakfast of Champions. The plot is seldom the point in a Vonnegut novel.

Oh sure, things happen, after a fashion. But it's more about people and ideas, and people with ideas, for better or worse.

I will however say that this book is a good starting point - not a necessary one, but a good one - from which to begin a Vonnegut reading journey.

His recurring character, the strange and often estranged author Kilgore Trout is fully explained here, much more so than in other books in which he makes an appearance, at least in the ones I've read.

In fact, many of the theories and rules of Vonnegut's world, his parallel universe, if you will, are laid out in this one, so I highly recommend starting here.

Then again, you won't go wrong starting elsewhere. Just start. View all 7 comments. May 13, Apatt rated it really liked it Shelves: mainstream.

Listen: What the hell was that? I finished reading Breakfast of Champions , closed the book, went to Goodreads, stared at that big empty review box, ate a cookie, stared at the screen some more, hands hovering over the keyboard, not moving.

And so on. Streams of consciousness, omitted quotation marks, massiv Listen: What the hell was that? Streams of consciousness, omitted quotation marks, massive infodumps, pages of philosophical ramblings etc.

I can not cope with such artistry, and I usually give up by page 50 or so. Breakfast of Champions is certainly an unconventional narrative.

While the main story arc moves forward in a linear fashion, Kurt Vonnegut makes so many tangential subplots, flashbacks, and anecdotes that I often forget where I was in the storyline; not to mention those lovely cartoonish drawings of his that appear every few pages.

It is a chaotic mess of a narrative. Only Vonnegut can get away with this kind of thing. Breakfast of Champions is completely bonkers, though.

Yes— there is a picture in this book of underpants. There are also surprisingly grim vignettes that come out of nowhere well, almost everything comes out of nowhere in this book.

Breakfast of Champions is often very funny and always eccentric. View all 17 comments. Dec 16, Manny rated it it was ok.

When I read this novel as a teenager, I remember finding the following paragraph strikingly witty: As children we were taught to memorize this year with pride and joy as the year people began living full and imaginative lives on the continent of North America.

Actually, people had been living full and imaginative lives on the continent of North America for hundreds of years before that. Though since then, the point has When I read this novel as a teenager, I remember finding the following paragraph strikingly witty: Though since then, the point has been made even more economically by the well-known poster below.

Maybe it was directly inspired by Vonnegut? When Vonnegut releases Kilgore Trout into the world on his fiftieth birthday and he looses the ghost of his father, this scabrous novel becomes a personal and moving account of a man, his father, and a big old lemon of a world.

But listen: this is a furious assault against all that America holds dear, an impish black comedy mixed with his typical whimsy, pitch-perfect satire, and unique Midwestern charm.

A film version was attempted in with that towering comedic presence Bruce Willis to disastrous results, turning real wit into sitcom farce.

View all 14 comments. Jul 28, Bradley rated it it was amazing Shelves: sci-fi , shelf , satire. It's really indecent how much I like this book.

It's nearly as indecent as how Vonnegut treated his character Kilgore Trout. Mind you, he doesn't rob, cheat or abuse the character in the traditional sense.

In fact, the author shows up, treats the damn guy to success, wealth and fame, tells him he's gonna win some fancy awards in the future, and he does it only because he can.

What a damn jerk. I mean, look at all these other SF authors other than Kilgore Trout who spend their lives writing stories It's really indecent how much I like this book.

This kind of unflinching gorgeous tribute in perfect irony to SF authors, in general, makes me weep. It stabs me in the heart.

Someone has probably counted all the myriad other preoccupations and nonsense. I did not. But it's overflowing.

And funny. And what's almost as good? Idea after idea after idea of great SF novels meant to hold up a mirror to us and make us ashamed. Oddly enough, I was fully prepared to hate this book and Vonnegut in general because he's popular and so many people who would sneer at SF would swear by him.

Damn it! In spite of a few funny one-liners and a humdinger of a premise, I don't like this book half as much as Vonnegut's earlier work.

It isn't just the fact that it's irritatingly repetitive, which it is, or that it grossly overuses the N-word, which it does.

It's this: Vonnegut seems tired, winded. His spirits are flagging. There is wistfulness but little warmth, as though a chill has settled on him.

My favorite Vonnegut puts on a brave face and holds out hope, speaks from a place of optimism. This In spite of a few funny one-liners and a humdinger of a premise, I don't like this book half as much as Vonnegut's earlier work.

This Vonnegut? Well, this guy is damned depressing. There may yet be great value in considering things that are damned depressing, though.

From time to time. And you can trust Vonnegut to make it worth your while. Although repetitive, he provides a lot of grist for the mill, philosophically speaking.

But it is too blunt to be a charmer and too bleak to be a comfort. He was a graduate of West Point. West Point was a military academy that turned young men into homicidal maniacs for use in war.

Another brilliant ride through Vonnegut-land. Also, I am now completely convinced of Mr. The Creator of He was a graduate of West Point.

The Creator of the Universe had put a rattle on its tail. The Creator had also given it front teeth which were hypodermic syringes filled with deadly poison.

Sometimes I wonder about the Creator of the Universe. View 2 comments. May 03, Daniel Clausen rated it it was amazing. Biting satire, crude drawings, crazy characters--a deliciously low-brow humor.

This is an amazing accomplishment. Who is Kilgore Trout? He is every hack writing who ever felt overwhelmed by his creativity and underwhelmed by his talent.

He is anyone who has ever tried and failed. I suppose there is a little Trout in all of us, especially if you like seafood. Kilgore Trout reminds me of Douglas Adams.

In a way the book is written with all the subtlety of a middle schooler--of course, underneath is the mind of genius. But then again, we were all smarter in middle school.

We were also free to use our imaginations before the forces out there told us that our writing and imagination was actually poo-poo. The book is squarely the child of the s.

It is blunt, childish, full of anger at Vietnam and the pollution of the earth. In the end, does the book have an ending? Do the pieces fit?

I should also say this--there is also a lots of fourth wall breaking. My view of this book is one of 3, on goodreads.

This can either make me feel insignificant, as one in an ocean of 3,, or it can make me feel part of a community.

Yes, a lot of fourth wall breaking. I want to say happy 50th anniversary to the author, but then I realize the book was written in the early s and Mr.

Vonnegut has since passed on. Thank you Fujisawa library for letting me read this book free of charge! Classy move Fujisawa library, classy move.

So, instead of trying to make meaning of things, he inserts crude drawings and uses these repetitive literary devices to make the story move.

If I could, I would draw a thumbs up. Do people really live lives that interesting? Orson Welles did.

But he was a director and movie star, not an author. My life is nowhere near that interesting. By the way, this is a fantastic book.

View all 20 comments. This was an interesting book. It was layered with black humor only the way Kurt Vonnegut could write.

There really is no plot, but the reading is very unique and paints a picture for the reader. The structuring is simple: simple sentences, simple syntax, and simple dialogue that gives way to big ideas.

I found myself thinking about it even when I wasn't reading: in the car on the way to work, in the evening. The illustrations that highlight the narrator's ideas are common sketches found on the c This was an interesting book.

The illustrations that highlight the narrator's ideas are common sketches found on the covers of his other works. I felt Kurt Vonnegut immeshed himself in the story as the Creator of the Universe.

His purpose was to purge and cleanse himself in some way. Maybe his emotions, or things built up over the years, who knows.

In the end he released his characters from the story. I saw common themes he uses to include freewill and mental illness. The two characters merged in the end and concluded an unusual story.

Overall in enjoyed it. Feb 11, Nathan "N. Shit, piss, fuck, cunt, cocksucker, motherfucker, tits. I shouldn't like this book.

It does things that I've disliked other modern writers for doing, authors like Adam Levin or Dave Eggers.

I don't like excessive cleverness that smells like pretension. I think a story can usually stand on its own without illustrations of staplers, and if it cannot then it probably wasn't a very good story to start.

I don't care for bells and whistles - they're loud and distracting and jarring. Kurt Vonnegut might be the Godfather of Bells and Whistles.

And, by god, he I shouldn't like this book. And, by god, he managed to do it without being insufferable. And, holy shit, he actually had something to say along the way.

Years ago I had surgery which took me out of commission for a while. I was staying with my boyfriend during my recovery, and we had only been together for about a month or two at the time.

I wasn't able to work, I had a gaping wound, and so my days basically consisted of popping pain pills and sleeping during the day and then being up late at night.

While I was up at night, I'd peruse this guy's bookshelves. It was then that I read the shit out of some Vonnegut. Somehow I never got around to reading this one - either it wasn't on my boyfriend's shelf at the time or maybe I healed up enough to be able to go back to work at that point and just never got to it.

But now, years later, in a different apartment, surrounded by different dogs, under different circumstances ie, no gaping wound, no pain pills , I find myself up after 1 in the morning finishing off another Vonnegut book.

The only thing that is the same is the boyfriend himself, in another room, sound asleep. I think Vonnegut is the sort of author that deserves to be read in one sitting, preferably at night.

No distractions. Vonnegut was a master writer, playing tricks on his readers and creating dimensions between his characters that most authors are not skilled enough or confident enough to be able to pull off.

For all intents and purposes, based on my history reading other authors who clearly were inspired by Vonnegut but failed because they thought they were being too cute, I should hate this book.

But I don't. Maybe it speaks to my disdain for most of society, maybe I feel something for the schizophrenic narrator. Mostly, though, I think it just feels like home, reading Vonnegut.

Kilgore Trout is practically family. Aug 06, Iulia rated it really liked it Shelves: read , honorable-mentions , books-to-read-in-a-lifetime.

I'm confused. I was thrown or more accurately, threw myself into Kurt Vonnegut's work blindly and completely unprepared.

After finishing Breakfast of Champions , a book about nothing in particular and which doesn't necessarily lead anywhere, I was left with the distinct impression that I am yet unable to fully grasp and appreciate Vonnegut's humor and satire.

In a less than shocking twist of fate however, I happen to love books that challenge me, and I've already formulated a plan to devour Vo I'm confused.

In a less than shocking twist of fate however, I happen to love books that challenge me, and I've already formulated a plan to devour Vonnegut's entire opus over the coming months.

Nevertheless, I loved it. Breakfast of Champions is hilarious. It is also semi-tragic, which makes it even funnier. I live for this kind of thing.

He was my favorite character by far. The rest of the book encompasses a cast of eccentric characters and an absurd little narrative, both of which are clever hosts for a not-so-disguised satirical look at American culture, with all its horrors and absurdities.

The point of the book? There isn't any. Don't think too much about it. View all 3 comments. Mar 18, Oriana rated it it was amazing Shelves: phenomenal , perennialfavorites , read-for-work , read Here was the plot: A flying saucer creature named Zog arrived on Earth to explain how wars could be prevented and how cancer could be cured.

He brought the information from Margo, a planet where the natives conversed by means of farts and tap dancing. Zog landed at night in Connecticut.

He had no sooner touched down than he saw a hous Why Kurt Vonnegut is a genius: As for the story itself, it was entitled "The Dancing Fool.

He had no sooner touched down than he saw a house on fire. He rushed into the house, farting and tap dancing, warning the people about the terrible danger they were in.

The head of the house brained Zog with a golfclub. Readers also enjoyed. Science Fiction. Literary Fiction. About Kurt Vonnegut Jr.

Kurt Vonnegut Jr. Kurt Vonnegut, Junior was an American novelist, satirist, and most recently, graphic artist. He was recognized as New York State Author for He was born in Indianapolis, later the setting for many of his novels.

He attended Cornell University from to , where he wrote a column for the student newspaper, the Cornell Daily Sun. Vonnegut trained as a chemist and worked as a journali Kurt Vonnegut, Junior was an American novelist, satirist, and most recently, graphic artist.

Vonnegut trained as a chemist and worked as a journalist before joining the U. Army and serving in World War II. After the war, he attended University of Chicago as a graduate student in anthropology and also worked as a police reporter at the City News Bureau of Chicago.

He attributed his unadorned writing style to his reporting work. His experiences as an advance scout in the Battle of the Bulge, and in particular his witnessing of the bombing of Dresden, Germany whilst a prisoner of war, would inform much of his work.

This event would also form the core of his most famous work, Slaughterhouse-Five, the book which would make him a millionaire.

This acerbic page book is what most people mean when they describe a work as "Vonnegutian" in scope. Vonnegut was a self-proclaimed humanist and socialist influenced by the style of Indiana's own Eugene V.

This article is about the novel. For the movie, see Breakfast of Champions film. For the breakfast cereal, see Wheaties.

Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, Jeffrey W. Detroit: Gale, Literature Resource Center. Susan Windisch Brown. New York: St. James Press, Carolyn Riley and Phyllis Carmel Mendelson.

Jerome Klinkowitz and Donald L. Delacorte Press, Dedria Bryfonski. Again, Dangerous Visions. The New York Times.

Retrieved 10 Apr Bestseller Index. Palm Sunday. Kurt Vonnegut. Kurt Vonnegut Museum and Library. Namespaces Article Talk.

Views Read Edit View history. Keep track of everything you watch; tell your friends. Full Cast and Crew. Release Dates. Official Sites. Company Credits.

Technical Specs. Plot Summary. Plot Keywords. Parents Guide. External Sites. User Reviews. User Ratings. External Reviews. Metacritic Reviews. Photo Gallery.

Trailers and Videos. Crazy Credits. Alternate Versions. Rate This. A rich car dealer is losing his mind. His son lives in the bomb shelter.

His suicidal wife has an affair with his transvestite sales manager. Director: Alan Rudolph. Writers: Kurt Vonnegut Jr.

Available on Amazon. Added to Watchlist. From metacritic. Albert Finney The Gem State Movies. Felix's Idle Film Fancies.

Full Cast and Crew. Release Dates. Official Sites. Company Credits. Technical Specs. Plot Summary. Plot Keywords.

Parents Guide. External Sites. User Reviews. User Ratings. External Reviews. Metacritic Reviews. Photo Gallery.

Trailers and Videos. Crazy Credits. Alternate Versions. Rate This. A rich car dealer is losing his mind.

His son lives in the bomb shelter. His suicidal wife has an affair with his transvestite sales manager. Director: Alan Rudolph.

Writers: Kurt Vonnegut Jr. Available on Amazon. Added to Watchlist. From metacritic. Albert Finney The Gem State Movies.

Felix's Idle Film Fancies. Albert Finney Movies. Share this Rating Title: Breakfast of Champions 4. Use the HTML below. You must be a registered user to use the IMDb rating plugin.

Edit Cast Cast overview, first billed only: Bruce Willis Dwayne Hoover Albert Finney Kilgore Trout Nick Nolte Harry Le Sabre Barbara Hershey Celia Hoover Glenne Headly Francine Pefko Lukas Haas George 'Bunny' Hoover Omar Epps Wayne Hoobler Vicki Lewis Grace Le Sabre Buck Henry Fred T.

Barry Ken Hudson Campbell Bill Bailey Will Patton I could go on and on. But what good would more information do, to paraphrase the author?

View all 15 comments. Jul 20, Lyn rated it it was amazing Shelves: all-time-most-favorite-books. This is one of my earliest favorites and I have gone back to revisit several times over the years.

In high school I was both amazed and hooked by Vonnegut's wry humor and devilish mid-western charm. I have since caught on to the more serious metaphors and themes into which he delves.

But the humor drew me in initially and makes me think of Vonnegut today. Insanity explained as a chemical imbalance and dysfunctional families, relationships and communities described as matter of factly as a still l This is one of my earliest favorites and I have gone back to revisit several times over the years.

Insanity explained as a chemical imbalance and dysfunctional families, relationships and communities described as matter of factly as a still life portrait.

The novel within a novel, and the recurring character of Kilgore Trout, further leaves the reader with a depth of appreciation for this classic.

When I think about Vonnegut and his writing, I am most often thinking of this book, his playful yet thoughtful way of describing his universe.

And here it is demonstrably his universe as he the author, the creator, makes a guest appearance in Midland City to see all the goings on firsthand.

And perhaps other creators, he does not control his handiworks by rigid cable and reign, but rather loosely and as with dry rubber bands.

Throughout this wonderful book we find drawings made by Vonnegut himself, illustrating his concepts and ideas. I smiled throughout the book, as I always do, and laughed out loud many times and many times because of his felt tip pen doodle.

Funny as he is, and charming too hen he wants to be, Vonnegut also tackles some heavy subjects as well, such as economics, fairness and institutional racism.

This book is about the fabulously well to do as well as for those who do not have diddlysquat. A joy. View all 18 comments.

What is life we live from day to day? What do we eat at breakfast? How do we cope with our problems and what are we doing for fun? What dreams do we dream and what ideas do we have in our heads?

The things other people have put into my head, at any rate, do not fit together nicely, are often useless and ugly, are out of proportion with one another, are out of proportion with life as it really is outside my head.

Under the close scrutiny of Kurt Vonnegut our quotidian life turns into the most prepo What is life we live from day to day? Under the close scrutiny of Kurt Vonnegut our quotidian life turns into the most preposterous occupation in the world.

He spoke of his wife and son again, acknowledged that white robots were just like black robots, essentially, in that they were programmed to be whatever they were, to do whatever they did.

Some obey God, some obey government, some obey voices in their heads and some obey no one. View all 4 comments. Jul 09, Tim P rated it did not like it.

God, what a terrible book of nonsense. The two main characters are just overly weird and bizarre for the sake of being bizarre. And I mean really really bizarre.

I suspect many people say they like Vonnegut because he is so damn weird, but theres gotta be a purpose to it. You can't just have completely random ridiculous thoughts that do not have any purpose towards the message of the story.

When you do that, its like the intellectual version of VH1 reality; people love it for shock value, while God, what a terrible book of nonsense.

When you do that, its like the intellectual version of VH1 reality; people love it for shock value, while I, and others like me, are disgusted by its lack of substance.

You feel dumber for having spent part of your life dedicated to it. Theres zero suspense as you are told what the ending will be in the first chapter.

The entire book is a build up to that "event" which ends up being a short, disappointingly mild one. The entire book was written in an obnoxious tone, speaking about everything "humans" do in an condescending manner.

As if the author considers himself not only separate from, but better than the human race and its tendencies. Finally, as if the book wasn't self indulgent enough for Vonnegut, he inserts HIMSELF as a character for the last third of the novel, telling us what he can and can't do if he wishes and how every characters actions are predetermined by his will, even as he interacts with them.

This came across as so arrogant and narcissistic that it was almost too much to bear. It is clear to me after reading Breakfast of Champions that Kurt Vonnegut's biggest fan, by far, is Kurt Vonnegut himself.

View all 61 comments. Good old Kurt God rest his soul has truly helped me understand what all this fuss is about "wide open beavers". This is a quick and rewarding read with funny drawings that makes you think about the world in a totally new way.

I love how Vonnegut writes about America as a civilization which died out long ago and is addressing an audience who knows nothing of it.

This book is hilarious and heart-breaking at the same time. It follows a sci-fi author Trout of Vonnegut's own creation who meets a Good old Kurt God rest his soul has truly helped me understand what all this fuss is about "wide open beavers".

It follows a sci-fi author Trout of Vonnegut's own creation who meets a Pontiac dealership owner Hoover in the 's. Their meeting puts Hoover over the edge of sanity through one of Trout's novels, making him believe he's the only person with free will in the universe, and that everyone else is a robot a meat machine as Vonnegut puts it.

The highlight for me is one of Trout's novels about an alien race that communicates only by farting and tap-dancing.

You have to read it to see what happens Jul 01, Jenna rated it really liked it Shelves: fiction , classic-of-the-month , satire , classics.

Me too. I'm not quite approaching my fiftieth, but yeh, me too. In Breakfast of Champions , Kurt Vonnegut writes as an author writing an author and their hapless creations.

He uses satire to poke fun at things like: Capitalism: "The chief weapon of the sea pirates, however, was their capacity to astonish.

Nobody else could believe, until it "As I approached my fiftieth birthday, I had become more and more enraged and mystified by the idiot decisions made by my countrymen.

Nobody else could believe, until it was much too late, how heartless and greedy they were. Actually, millions of human beings were already living full and imaginative lives on the continent in That was simply the year in which sea pirates began to cheat and rob and kill them.

Are we at the mercy of some creator, our stories already written? Are we at the mercy of our brain chemistry, which dictates what we do and when we do it?

I generally love satire and Vonnegut does it well. There were several "chuckle moments" in this book. There were also a few parts where it dragged but for the most part, I enjoyed it.

I will note that the "N" word is used extensively. It's offensive I hope to modern ears, but it gets our attention and forces white people to reflect on our own ugliness and complicity in racism.

It shoves a mirror right up in our faces. Vonnegut uses stereotypes of Black people in order to speak against racism, which is a prevalent theme throughout the book.

The stereotyping of his characters was used to portray the idiocy of seeing people with preconceived ideas based on one aspect of who they are.

I appreciate that Mr. Vonnegut placed the problem of racism firmly on the heads of white people. When his characters filled a stereotype, it was because white people had given them no other choice.

For example, Black characters were sometimes criminals and drug dealers, but that was because white people either wouldn't hire them or, when they did, wouldn't pay them a living wage.

The characters were left with little choice but to engage in criminal behavior in order to support their families.

White people often create stereotypes for minorities, force them into filling it, and then blame the minority for fitting the stereotype instead of placing the blame where it truly belongs.

They use the stereotype news alert: most Black people are not criminals in order to place the blame on the victims.

But we deserve the blame. Not Blacks, not Latinx. So don't give me that BS about drugs in the inner city and "black on black" crime as though white people never kill other white people.

It's a poor excuse and you know it. Not to mention that even if someone does engage in criminal activity, they never deserve to be murdered because of it.

So anyway The more I think about it, the more I appreciate the clever way in which Vonnegut used this book to speak against institutional racism.

Though this is a very serious subject and the book is philosophical at heart, it is written in a light-hearted way.

It's a quick and easy read and I didn't even quite notice what Vonnegut was doing until I reflected on the book after having finished it.

There are many truths in this book and Vonnegut's use of satire to point them out was brilliant. June classic-of-the-month View all 39 comments.

Apr 17, Anthony Vacca rated it it was amazing. Back before I nicked a diploma and put that particular time and place in the rearview, there were only two authors that nearly all of my fellow Liberal Arts College English majors blabbered-on about unendingly: Chuck Palahniuk and Kurt Vonnegut.

Add to the equation the variable that most of these hep cats thought Shakespeare and Hemingway two of me best mates at the time were talentless hacks, and what you get the other side of that equal sign is an Anthony that is going to take his chances and steer clear of the Vonnegut circle jerk sessions.

With that introductory diatribe out of the way, I can now say that, yes, I was wrong about Vonnegut, and so now we can all move right on along to my review.

Breakfast of Champions is a sad and gloomy slice of metafiction that still manages to find a sense of humor about what an awful fucking nightmare it is to exist in this sad sorry sack of shit of an excuse for a world.

If read aloud, every sentence in this book should end with a sigh and a defeated glance out the window at nothing but a bleak view of nothing.

The focus of this book is the hours leading up to a chance meeting between Kilgore Trout, a loser who writes off-beat science fiction novels that nobody reads, and Dwayne Hoover, a successful car salesman who is starting to lose his shit in a major way.

Along the way there is plenty of time for digressions full of deadpan takedowns of American culture as well as for dozens of endearing little doodles from our author.

Vonnegut makes it clear that there is so much in this world that makes him angry, and getting older does nothing to ease his resentment.

View all 30 comments. I needed this book. You have no idea how much so. Vonnegut is just so hilarious. It boarders upon the outrageous and plain mad.

He points at it and has a good old laugh. He's good like that. He explores, and perhaps even defines, an anti-narrative style.

The first chapter of the book, along with its many intertextual references to the real world, tells you how the plot is going to end. He also uses self-reflective addresses in the middle of a narrative sequence: his own personal voice comes through, the voice of the individual, and acknowledges the fact that this is actually a book.

How many books randomly point out the fact that they are actually a book? He stops and informs you of the choices he has made.

This is wonderfully comic. Vonnegut is part of the story. They were discussing the possible purposes of life as they ate sugar and suffocated in their own excrement.

Because of their limited intelligence, they never came close to guessing that they were making champagne. Superbly so.

He is witty in his bizarrely written narrative. You have to read his books to understand. Vonnegut is just unique. There were moments in his book that produced within me real gut wrenching laughter.

Not a simple chuckle or a casual outburst, but real laughter. The type that brightens your day and make other people think that you, too, have gone slightly mad.

But who cares? Perhaps since the last Vonnegut book I read. Few others could. I wonder if any of his other books actually will be.

Also the image in my review is one of many ridiculous images Vonnegut includes within the story. Because why the hell not? View all 10 comments.

Feb 23, Ian "Marvin" Graye rated it it was amazing Shelves: reviews , re-read , read , reviewsstars , vonnegut. But, first, I decided to go down to the cocktail lounge for a drink.

All the seats at the bar were taken, so I had to sit by myself at a table for four. The waitress took my order.

A dry martini. The breakfast of champions! I recognised his name as one of the writers who was appearing at the Arts Festival.

We had barely started a conversation, when another man came up and sat down. At first, he paid no attention to me. Trout, I love you. And who might you be?

Coincidentally, he was the writer of the book I'd just finished reading. In fact, I had a vague recollection that he might have died.

Or had he won the Nobel Prize? Or both? All that mattered to me was that he was alive when he wrote this book. Or somebody was. Though it didn't seem to bother him that he might have been created by an author.

Now I want you to feel a wholeness and inner harmony such as I have never allowed you to feel before. The word is you're quite a character! By the way I thought you two would be inseparable.

I sipped my martini, trying to think of something witty to say. I had no idea what he was talking about. I could go on and on with the intimate details of our conversation, but what good is more information?

You already know enough about human beings. And so on, etc. It sounded right. Would you like another martini? I never saw him again, nor my drink. Somebody else sat in his seat.

I looked at my watch. It was time I went. What did he mean by that? It sounded impressive. I tried to imagine what it must be like inside his head.

I tried to look at things from his perspective. Perhaps I tried a little too hard, for the next time I looked at our table, neither one of us was there.

Breakfast of Champions View all 11 comments. Mar 07, Darwin8u rated it really liked it Shelves: Sometimes I think of it as second shelf Vonnegut four stars.

I think it could exist easily on both shelves. Since I own a couple copies, and have read it a couple times, I will forever physically keep it on two shelves Library of America on one, Laurel Mass-Market Paperback on a lower shelf.

The Laurel Mass-Market is also the one I try to bribe and incentivize my son into reading. I'm sure the picture of the asshole and the beavers might just be the inspiration my sixteen-year old needs to start this book.

Here is a picture of Vonnegut's drawing of an asshole tattooed on a young man's arm: Here is a picture of Vonnegut's drawings of beavers, in what looks like a Finnish copy of Breakfast of Champions if you look really close you can also see Vonnegut's drawing of women's underwear bleeding through in blue : Speaking of vaginas.

Today is Valentines Day. Christians, and by Christians I mean a Pope I can't remember who , tried to turn a Roman festival into a Christian holiday honoring a martyr this also could be a common myth.

I'm more fascinated, however, by Roman festivals than I am by martyrs or myths. Anyway, Valentines was supposed to smother out Lupercalia, a day where men dressed in the skins of sacrificed goats, in imitation of Lupercus, and ran around the walls of old Rome, with the thongs called februa in their hands whipping people mostly people with XX chromosomes who happened to be around.

Here is an artsy painting of men dressed in goat skins whipping women: Women, girls, and childbearing young women would line up to receive lashes from these whip-wielding Romans.

Anyway, I started and finished this book on Valentines. I also took my wife out for Mexican food tonight and bought her exactly 2.

Here is a graphic showing how people decide which restaurants to go to on Valentines: The only reason I bring this up is today is Valentines and also because Vonnegut wrote published this book in Since I was born in almost in the dead center of , the reality is I spent some period of -- as this book was flooding the Earth -- being conceived I try not to think too hard about this and gestated or this and eventually birthed or this either.

I think, perhaps, my birth was so easy for my mom because of Vonnegut's book. Well, this book. Yes, I am saying that in February , this book with a drawing of two beavers in it, might have been a literal februa for my mother.

Perhaps, Vonnegut pounding these words into existence somehow helped in my conception. Well yes, there is my father, but this is way beyond Fathers and Sons.

All I know for certain that part of my brain since my teenage years has been marked, folded, energized by Vonnegut. Not through magic or some mystical force, but rather through the teeth and bite and whip of his words.

The old fashioned way. Here is a picture of my brain receiving its extra fold from Vonnegut's at age 5 months: [image error] View all 6 comments.

Apr 12, Justin rated it really liked it. So this guy, Dwayne Hoover, is a rich owner of stuff, primarily a Pontiac dealership, and he has these bad chemicals in his brain.

Kilgore Trout is this completely unknown science fiction writer whose stories are printed in adult magazines and such. Anyway, Dwayne reads one of Trout's novels and he thinks it's real which really messes with those bad chemicals in his brain.

The book is this collision course of these two meeting each other with all kinds of distractions and subplots and observatio So this guy, Dwayne Hoover, is a rich owner of stuff, primarily a Pontiac dealership, and he has these bad chemicals in his brain.

The book is this collision course of these two meeting each other with all kinds of distractions and subplots and observations thrown in the mix.

Vonnegut himself is a character in the book, and if you think it already sounds weird, the last third of the book gets even weirder!

But, oh man oh man, it is fascinating! It's hilarious! It's pessimistic! It's honestly one of he strangest books I have ever read, but it is also the most fun I've had reading a book in a long time.

And the themes presented aren't fun themes. Vonnegut hits on some pretty heavy stuff, and he never holds back in how he presents it.

There are some very interesting illustrations as well. They don't really add much to the story, but they are there. Sometimes it's a picture of an apple, sometimes it's a road sign, sometimes it's an interesting take on human anatomy.

That place a pretty big role as well. About halfway through, Vonnegut takes some time to break down female and male measurements and keeps it going throughout the rest of the book.

Again, not sure what it added to the story, but it was there. A lot of stuff was just there. And it was awesome.

I don't know why. He really hits on humans as robots and free will. Vonnegut has a pretty bleak outlook on life and society in general, and he presents his worldview in a very unique way in this book.

For such negativity, I had a blast reading it. It was much more straightforward and, in my opinion, it was much better than Slaughterhouse Five.

I can't even remember why I wanted to read this, but wow was it a great surprise. I don't think I'll read anything like it again.

View all 5 comments. Feb 04, Jason Koivu rated it it was amazing Shelves: fiction , comedy , humor. I mean "classic" Vonnegut.

It feels good to be back! I mean no offense to his most recent work, but it just doesn't compare with what he put out from about the '60s through to the '80s.

It's all good stuff. I mean, I've read about a dozen books of his and I don't recall a true stinker in the lot.

But if I'm going to recommend "a Vonnegut" to the interested and uninitiated, it's going to be something like Breakfast of Champions from This chuckle-full and sometimes hilarious tour de force of satirical wit is a razor-sharp criticism of humanity's worst traits: its greed, its pure and unadulterated avarice, its lack of a moral compass Ah, that last one is a tricky one.

Vonnegut was no saint and he doesn't expect anyone else to be. However, a little decency and compassion would go a long way. Jesus fucking Christ, Vonnegut seems to say in just about every one of his books, can't we all stop acting like shits for second?!

I won't try to describe the plot of Breakfast of Champions. The plot is seldom the point in a Vonnegut novel. Oh sure, things happen, after a fashion.

But it's more about people and ideas, and people with ideas, for better or worse. I will however say that this book is a good starting point - not a necessary one, but a good one - from which to begin a Vonnegut reading journey.

His recurring character, the strange and often estranged author Kilgore Trout is fully explained here, much more so than in other books in which he makes an appearance, at least in the ones I've read.

In fact, many of the theories and rules of Vonnegut's world, his parallel universe, if you will, are laid out in this one, so I highly recommend starting here.

Then again, you won't go wrong starting elsewhere. Just start. View all 7 comments. May 13, Apatt rated it really liked it Shelves: mainstream.

Listen: What the hell was that? I finished reading Breakfast of Champions , closed the book, went to Goodreads, stared at that big empty review box, ate a cookie, stared at the screen some more, hands hovering over the keyboard, not moving.

And so on. Streams of consciousness, omitted quotation marks, massiv Listen: What the hell was that? Streams of consciousness, omitted quotation marks, massive infodumps, pages of philosophical ramblings etc.

I can not cope with such artistry, and I usually give up by page 50 or so. Breakfast of Champions is certainly an unconventional narrative. While the main story arc moves forward in a linear fashion, Kurt Vonnegut makes so many tangential subplots, flashbacks, and anecdotes that I often forget where I was in the storyline; not to mention those lovely cartoonish drawings of his that appear every few pages.

It is a chaotic mess of a narrative. Only Vonnegut can get away with this kind of thing. Breakfast of Champions is completely bonkers, though.

Yes— there is a picture in this book of underpants. There are also surprisingly grim vignettes that come out of nowhere well, almost everything comes out of nowhere in this book.

Breakfast of Champions is often very funny and always eccentric. View all 17 comments. Dec 16, Manny rated it it was ok.

When I read this novel as a teenager, I remember finding the following paragraph strikingly witty: As children we were taught to memorize this year with pride and joy as the year people began living full and imaginative lives on the continent of North America.

Actually, people had been living full and imaginative lives on the continent of North America for hundreds of years before that.

Though since then, the point has When I read this novel as a teenager, I remember finding the following paragraph strikingly witty: Though since then, the point has been made even more economically by the well-known poster below.

Maybe it was directly inspired by Vonnegut? When Vonnegut releases Kilgore Trout into the world on his fiftieth birthday and he looses the ghost of his father, this scabrous novel becomes a personal and moving account of a man, his father, and a big old lemon of a world.

But listen: this is a furious assault against all that America holds dear, an impish black comedy mixed with his typical whimsy, pitch-perfect satire, and unique Midwestern charm.

A film version was attempted in with that towering comedic presence Bruce Willis to disastrous results, turning real wit into sitcom farce.

View all 14 comments. Jul 28, Bradley rated it it was amazing Shelves: sci-fi , shelf , satire. It's really indecent how much I like this book.

It's nearly as indecent as how Vonnegut treated his character Kilgore Trout. Mind you, he doesn't rob, cheat or abuse the character in the traditional sense.

In fact, the author shows up, treats the damn guy to success, wealth and fame, tells him he's gonna win some fancy awards in the future, and he does it only because he can.

What a damn jerk. I mean, look at all these other SF authors other than Kilgore Trout who spend their lives writing stories It's really indecent how much I like this book.

This kind of unflinching gorgeous tribute in perfect irony to SF authors, in general, makes me weep.

It stabs me in the heart. Someone has probably counted all the myriad other preoccupations and nonsense.

I did not. But it's overflowing. And funny. And what's almost as good? Idea after idea after idea of great SF novels meant to hold up a mirror to us and make us ashamed.

Oddly enough, I was fully prepared to hate this book and Vonnegut in general because he's popular and so many people who would sneer at SF would swear by him.

Damn it!

Breakfast Of Champions - Inhaltsverzeichnis

Kurt Vonnegut Jr. Return to Book Page. Breakfast Of Champions Breakfast Of Champions Policemen all had Westworl. Erste Bewertung verfassen. To ask other readers questions about Breakfast of Lottalebenplease sign up. Read more Fresh, funny, outrageous Cj Durchgeknallt 1999 favorite Vonnegut book is 'Bluebeard. Dddlme Bewertung verfassen. Read more Beide weigerten sich glattweg, Niggerarbeit zu tun. Ich mochte das Buch über sehr weite Strecken, mochte die kurzen Absätze, die Abschweifungen von der Hauptgeschichte, die vielen Details über die vielen Nebencharaktere. Mahana könnte vermutlich über jeden in diesem Buch ein eigenes Buch schreiben. Fresh, funny, outrageous Average rating 4. Just a Blue Marvel while we sign you in to your Goodreads account. Start your review of Breakfast of Champions. Breakfast Of Champions Breakfast of Champions. FSK 12 Minuten | USA Den alltäglichen Wahnsinn in einer amerikanischen Kleinstadt zelebriert Alan Rudolphs. Jetzt online bestellen! Heimlieferung oder in Filiale: Breakfast of Champions von Kurt Vonnegut | Orell Füssli: Der Buchhändler Ihres Vertrauens. Thalia: Infos zu Autor, Inhalt und Bewertungen ❤ Jetzt»Breakfast of Champions«nach Hause oder Ihre Filiale vor Ort bestellen!

Breakfast Of Champions See a Problem? Video

Nehraji Unfiltered - BwC S3E7 - Ashish Nehra God, what a terrible book of nonsense. Just start. Welcome back. View all 61 comments. Thanks Fußball Wm 2019 Live Stream Zdf telling us about the problem. I generally love satire and Vonnegut does it well.

Breakfast Of Champions See a Problem?

Sharon Horgan habe mich sehr oft ertappt, wie ich noch mehr über bestimmte Personen und ihre Geschichte wissen wollte. Eins meiner absoluten Lieblingsbücher. Ich mochte das Buch über sehr weite Strecken, mochte die kurzen Absätze, die Abschweifungen von der Hauptgeschichte, die vielen Details über die vielen Nebencharaktere. Rating details. Books by Kurt Vonnegut Alles Hassen Chris. He Yuri Anime 2019 Cornell Streaming Urteil 2019 from towhere he wrote a column for the student newspaper, the Cornell Daily Sun. Und die fourth wall wird noch stärker durchbrochen als in Slaughterhouse Five. Welcome back.

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3 Kommentare zu „Breakfast Of Champions“

  1. Ich entschuldige mich, aber meiner Meinung nach lassen Sie den Fehler zu. Es ich kann beweisen. Schreiben Sie mir in PM, wir werden umgehen.

    Mir scheint es der bemerkenswerte Gedanke

    die Prächtige Phrase

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